Educational Interpreting: It’s Not Just a Job, It’s an Adventure!

  • 19 Mar 2016
  • 20 Mar 2016
  • 2 sessions
  • 19 Mar 2016, 8:30 AM 4:30 PM (UTC-07:00)
  • 20 Mar 2016, 8:30 AM 4:30 PM (UTC-07:00)
  • UC San Diego Pepper Canyon Hall Room 340
  • 0

Registration

  • this option is for EVERYONE who registers after March 4th, regardless of your affiliation.
  • This is to be used by PDC only

Registration is closed


San Diego County Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf presents the Spring 2016 weekend workshop series


Educational Interpreting: It’s Not Just a Job, It’s an Adventure! (1.5 CEUs)


Melissa Smith has dedicated her time and expertise on the issue of educational interpreting, but it seems that this workshop is NOT just for those who work in a K-12 setting. 


Melissa has presented this workshop on the east and west coast, and we are fortunate to have her present it to us in her home town, San Diego! 


About the presenter:

Dr. Melissa Smith is a professor in and the director of the ASL-English interpreting program at Palomar College in San Marcos, California. She earned doctoral and Master's degrees in Teaching and Learning from the University of California, San Diego, and a BA in Spanish with a minor in American Indian Studies from San Diego State University. Her doctoral research explores the practices and decisions of interpreters working in public schools and was published by Gallaudet University Press as More than Meets the Eye: Revealing the Complexities of an Interpreted Education (2013). Her extensive background in education, her own experiences as a second language learner, and her work as an interpreter and interpreter educator allow her to examine the work of educational interpreters through multiple lenses. More importantly, as the parent of a Deaf teenager, she brings a unique perspective to her work and presentations. 


Are you an interpreter thinking...


"I am a highly qualified, certified interpreter with years of experience. Educational interpreting workshops are not for me. They are for K12 interpreters and I rarely work in educational settings."

If this describes you, please read on!


Top 10 reasons to Attend


­­­­­­­­10. Community interpreters significantly impact the practice and beliefs of all interpreters because we work in so many settings and with so many people. I am asking you to come as honored guests and for the sake of any and all Deaf people that did not have the best school experiences. I'd like you to join a team of professionals who aim to create positive change.

9. Good interpreting has many similarities at its core, regardless of the setting in which you work. Good interpreting is good interpreting; good interpreting workshops are good interpreting workshops. They are interesting, engaging, and thought provoking.

8. This is a good interpreting workshop! It will be interesting, engaging, and thought provoking!

7. There has been much discussion about role space and the ways in which interpreters influence interactions. An exploration of real examples from the personal experiences of the parent of a Deaf teenager and from field research in real classrooms will open the door to thinking about how our decisions influence interactions in all settings.

6. In a national survey of RID certified interpreters, 40% of respondents indicated that over 50% of their work is in educational settings. Even if you never work in educational settings, you probably work with someone who does. What could happen if we open honest dialogues about professional practice?

5. Demand-control schema allows interpreters to analyze situations and settings and identify appropriate responses. Specific examples of real situations with interpreters and Deaf students give us rich opportunities to discuss factors that influence our moment to moment decisions about what to do.

4. Unlike other educational interpreting workshops, this one is only for interpreters who are certified or have met California state qualification standards. This is my investment in you and the Deaf community because I believe we can make a difference. Come hear me out.

3. You can earn 1.6 CEUs in Professional Studies for a good price while networking with other professionals. This is a great deal!

2. We need you! Please come!


1. Together we can make a difference. Let's step up and step it up for Deaf and hard of hearing youth!



Or are you not an interpreter and thinking...


"I am a Deaf person, a teacher of the Deaf, an interpreter educator, a parent of a Deaf child, or an administrator of Deaf education. Educational interpreting workshops are not for me. They are for aimed to provide basic vocabulary for beginning K12 interpreters."

If this describes you, please read on!


­­­­­­­­10. Most Deaf people have not had great school experiences. I invite you to come and join a team of community members who aim to create positive change.

9. Good interpreting and good Deaf education share many similar characteristics. What is it that educated Deaf families know and pass on to their children? 

8. This is a good interpreting workshop! It will be interesting, engaging, and thought provoking!

7. Like interpreters, when you interact with Deaf and hard of hearing youth with various language and learning backgrounds, you make decisions that affect their lives. An exploration of real examples from the personal experiences of the parent of a Deaf teenager and from field research in real classrooms will open the door to thinking about how our decisions influence teaching and learning interactions in all settings.

6. In a national survey of RID certified interpreters, 40% of respondents indicated that over 50% of their work is in educational settings. Wouldn’t you like to know what they do and what factors inform their moment to moment decisions?


5. Interpreters learn to analyze situations and settings and identify appropriate responses on the job. Specific examples of real situations with interpreters and Deaf students give us rich opportunities to discuss factors that influence interpreters’ decisions about what to do. Come and learn what decisions interpreters are faced with and left to figure out on their own.

4. Unlike many educational interpreting workshops, this one is specifically intended for highly qualified professionals and active parents. It is based on research and also integrates personal stories about language acquisition and education based on observation of 4 children with different language backgrounds.

3. This workshop is compelling and inspiring. Come see why it is time to act while networking with other people who care about Deaf and hard of hearing youth.

2. It takes a village to raise a child. The community needs you.


1. I believe we can make a difference. Let's step up and step it up for Deaf and hard of hearing youth!


---------


There is a crisis in Deaf education. You can help!

If you think Deaf and hard of hearing kids deserve a better shot in mainstream schools, please read on.

  • Over 95% of Deaf and hard of hearing students have hearing parents who are most likely not fluent in sign.
  • It takes 5-7 years to develop academic language skills in a language when exposed to fluent language models.  
  • Over 75% of Deaf and hard of hearing students are mainstreamed. Many of these students access instruction and social interactions through interpreters.
  •  Even if interpreters are highly proficient, they have likely not been trained in how to work effectively with dual language learners who have language delays and who have not been provided as many incidental learning opportunities as their peers.
  • 92% of Deaf students and 85% of hard of hearing students are NOT meeting California’s desired Language Arts standard of “Proficient.”  (This means only 8-15% are getting what used to be called a ‘B’ or better in Language Arts.)
  • The current system is not meeting the needs of Deaf and hard of hearing students.
  • It’s Time to Step Up for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth!
Please help spread the word about this workshop! 


Again, this workshop is open to just about anyone who has an interest in working/interacting with DHH people, both adult and youth. Primary audience is for working Interpreters (both educational and community) we are inviting Deaf educators, interpreter educators, parents, and persons interested in improving the language proficiencies, education and learning outcomes of DHH students will find the information valuable.    


Workshop Description: 

Interpreters need to optimize visual access, promote the learning of content and two languages, as well as cultivate opportunities for participation. Although these endeavors are undoubtedly critical in creating truly inclusive environments, interpreters are often left on their own to determine how to meet these competing demands. Workshop participants will learn strategies to improve school experiences for DHH youth and bring exemplary practices back to their local communities. This workshop will be presented in American Sign Language. 


Workshop Logistics: 

March 19, 8:30am to 4:30 pm (.75 CEUs)* 

March 20, 8:30am to 4:30 pm (.75 CEUs)* 

Preferential seating to those persons who are signing up for BOTH days (earning 1.5 CEUs).


Breakfast and lunch provided


Workshop given in ASL -- Upon request, family members or educators may request spoken English interpreters no later than March 4, 2016


* Saturday and Sunday are being treated as two separate CEU events, and therefore if you are unable to make both days, you can still earn 0.75 CEUs by only attending one. The day price will be ~ $10 more, and you will need to send an email to PDC@sdcrid.org informing us which day you would like to attend and which category you fit (SDCRID member, parent, etc), and we will send you an invoice.


1.5 CEUs (for both days) in the category of Professional Studies will be offered by the Western Region Interpreter Education Center at Western Oregon University, an approved RID CMP and ACET sponsor.


Early bird deadline was February 19, 2016 and thus you will no longer be able to register at the lower cost. These rates will continue until March 4, then late registration will continue until the start of the workshop. 


Location:

UC San Diego (La Jolla Campus)

Pepper Canyon Hall Room 340

9500 Gilman Drive

La Jolla, CA 92093


Cost/Registration: 

Please see our website for details on costs and deadlines for registration. www.SDCRID.org 

if you are interested in only one day, see above paragraph.


If you have more questions, please feel free to contact PDC@sdcrid.org 


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